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Useful Information

Resources on "Digital Drama" & Cyberbullying
 
These days, with students learning more about how to find the information instead of simply memorizing it, it is becoming increasingly easy for them to simply take things from the internet for free, or even without acknowledging or giving credit for the work. Common examples include: grabbing text to quote in essays, downloading and using images in digital slideshows (i.e. Powerpoint) and artwork with out proper credit, using downloaded music in video projects, etc. Because it is so easy, many people begin to feel like it is not wrong to simply take and use the resources. A larger danger exists when a student does not learn about this and continues the same behavior into college and in the working world when the consequences can be much more severe.
  • Helpful Info Sheet on Plagiarism and Piracy (Digital Ownership) - English     Espanol
 
The words "bullying" and "cyberbullying" are hot-button topics today, and most parents, students, and school personnel have strong opinions about them. Most of the time, we focus on the bully and the victim as a 1-on-1 situation, but often we forget that there are more impacted parties that are frequently neglected in the analysis. Who else is affected?
 
Data, data, data! Information about customers/consumers/clients/etc. is king in the world of marketing and sales. Almost all computer applications and technological equipment tries to acquire data on its users for several reasons, one of which is to provide better service. However, it should still be up to you what information they get on you. Learn how to take control over your online privacy settings.
 
Fame seems to be very much valued by today's youth. It's in music, movies, and so many realms of pop culture. Students, as teenagers, are even able to achieve fame much more easily by using social media and online resources. But what happens when teens become famous overnight? 
 
There are several "records" that one should be wary of negatively impacting. We know about academic records, driving records, criminal records, credit scores, etc. What about what we put on the internet? Is it true that what is put online will forever have an imprint even after it's deleted? How might what you put on the internet today have real-life impacts on your future? Will colleges see? How about workplaces?